ArcticNet in the News

ArcticNet in the news

ArcticNet in the News - Year 2008

30 December 2008
The Canadian Press, Western News, The Western Gazette – ArcticNet Network Investigator, Dr. Gordon McBean is one of 60 new appointments to the Order of Canada. Dr. McBean was recognized for his contributions to the advancement of climate and atmospheric sciences in Canada and honoured for his leadership in national international scientific organizations, helping to generate and disseminate research findings to policymakers and stakeholders.

29 December 2008
Le Soleil – The article discusses the fact that the climate is warming with 2008 ranking as the tenth warmest year since 1850. The article concludes in saying that the warming is in concurrence with results presented at the Arctic Change 2008 conference.

24 December 2008
The Canadian Press – ArcticNet Network Investigator, Michael Byers, is quoted on a communication released by the European Union on developing a formal Arctic policy. While some Arctic experts see this move as a threat to Canadian sovereignty, Byers welcomes the input of the European Union given their strong stance on the issue of climate change and that the Arctic is a huge place that will require the input of many, but not where it goes against rights well-established under the Law of the Sea.

24 December 2008
Tierramérica – Mary Simon, President of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami and Co-Chair of the ArcticNet Board of Directors is interviewed in this article about the impact of climate change on Inuit. Mary Simon outlines the crisis of climate change and provides suggestions as to what Canada should do to tackle the issue.

24 December 2008
The Headliner (December 24 and 25, 2008), Winnipeg Lance (December 23, 2008) – The Headliner, a local Manitoba paper, covered the research of David Barber who is a resident in the paper’s target community. The article provides an overview of the preliminary research results ArcticNet Network Investigator David Barber presented at Arctic Change from the IPY project he led, the Circumpolar Flaw Lead System Study.

24 December 2008
NOW Magazine – This article about Polar Bear swim in Toronto, ON references results released at Arctic Change 2008 indicating an ice-free summer by 2015.

19 December 2008
The Peterborough Examiner – Two ArcticNet graduate students from Trent University are featured in this article that acknowledges the poster awards received by the students at Arctic Change 2008 for excellence in research. ArcticNet Network Investigator and Trent University Professor Chris Furgal is also featured in the article and details are provided on his participation in Arctic Change 2008.

18 December 2008
CBC-TV – Dr. Kue Young and Mary Simon were interviewed on Dr. Young’s research on cancer rates among circumpolar Inuit. Reactions from northerners were also considered. The show aired on newscasts in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut.

17 December 2008
Quebec Express – The participation of ArcticNet Scientific Director Louis Fortier in the Arctic Climate Change Youth Forum is described in a short article. The Forum preceded Arctic Change 2008 and was organized by Schools on Board, an ArcticNet outreach program, and a local Québec high school.

16 December 2008
Agence Science-Presse – This article references Arctic Change 2008 and keynote speaker Donald Rothwell from the ANU College of Law, The Australian National University.

16 December 2008
LW Nordpol – This article discusses Arctic Change 2008 and quotes ArcticNet Board Director Duane Smith and Network Investigators Gordon McBean and David Barber.

15 December 2008
Globe and Mail – The article compares the urgency of the results released at Arctic Change 2008 to the response of governments at the United Nations Climate Change Conference held in Poznań, Poland.

15 December 2008
Inter Press Service, Business Mirror (December 21, 2008) – Arctic Change delegates released a declaration emphasizing the rapid rate of change measured in the Arctic as a result of climate change and the implications for the North and the rest of the world. The article discusses the declaration in light of talks at the United Nations Climate Change Convention in Poznań, Poland.

15 December 2008
Daily Planet – Dr. Warwick Vincent, ArcticNet Network Investigator was on Discovery Channel’s Daily Planet speaking about his research on Ellesmere Island, Nunavut. Dr. Vincent’s research has the documented dramatic and irreversible break-up of the northern Ellesmere Island ice shelves. Over a three week period in 2008, 23 percent of the total area of the ice shelves, comprising the thickest and oldest marine ice in the Arctic basin, collapsed over a three week period. As a result habitat has been completely lost, but research has shown that these changes open the way for new species to make use of previously inaccessible ecosystems.

15 December 2008
Le Soleil – The article discusses the urgency for scientists and politicians to discuss the impacts of climate change and the need for renewed research support as the International Polar Year comes to an end. ArcticNet Board Director Duane Smith is quoted speaking to the importance of collaborating with Inuit whose traditional knowledge of the Arctic environment can provide valuable input to research projects.

14 December 2008
ABC Online, Australia – The article discusses the findings presented at Arctic Change 2008 that indicate the Arctic could have an ice-free summer as early as 2015, with reference to the impacts on wildlife, ecosystems and Inuit communities.

14 December 2008
Mondiaal Magazine – This article discusses research by ArcticNet Network Investigator David Barber and references the Arctic Change 2008 conference where Dr. Barber presented preliminary results from his Circumpolar Flaw Lead System Study.

14 December 2008
Les Années lumière – Chantal Srivastava, journalist for Les Années lumière, attended the Arctic Change 2008 conference interviewing several of the conference delegates for two shows of Les Années lumière that aired on December 14, 2008 and January 11, 2009.

The December 14, 2008 show can be heard online.

The January 11, 2009 show can be heard online. The show featured interviews with President of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami and Co-Chair of the ArcticNet Board of Directors, Mary Simon, as well as ArcticNet Network Investigators Dominique Berteaux, Christopher Furgal and Barry Smit.

An accompany article to the radio programs can be found online.

13 December 2008
Inter Press Service, LaJornada (December 15, 2008) – The article quotes ArcticNet Network Investigator David Barber and International Partnership Initiative partner Paul Wassmann on how quickly changes are being observed in the North, specifically as they relate to sea ice. Reductions in sea ice are having a huge impact on phytoplankton growth trends, with a 300 percent increase measured in some parts of the Arctic Ocean. As the Arctic shifts into a new regime, it is felt that data from the past will be unreliable.

12 December 2008
AFP, LaJornada – The article, printed in English, French, Spanish and German, quotes Dr. Kue Young, University of Toronto professor and ArcticNet Network Investigator, who presented results from a study of cancer trends among circumpolar Inuit. Lung cancer is rapidly increasing with the most logical reason being the high smoking rate among Inuit, according to Dr. Young and co-authors on the Circumpolar Journal of Health article.

12 December 2008
Globe and Mail, Daily Herald Tribune – The article describes preliminary research results presented by ArcticNet Network Investigator, Dr. David Barber, that indicate the Arctic could be seasonally ice-free by 2015, with widespread consequences for Inuit communities, wildlife and the entire northern ecosystem. Further the article references the Declaration released by Arctic Change delegates reinforcing the rapid pace changes are occurring and that the social and economic challenge are only going to increase exponentially. ArcticNet Network Investigator, Dr. Gordon McBean, is quoted commenting on the role of the Canadian government in climate change talks.

12 December 2008
Guelph Tribune – The article discusses Network Investigator Barry Smit’s research conducted as part of ArcticNet and his presentation of research results at the Arctic Change 2008 conference. Smit’s research focuses on the profound implications of climate change for people who live in Canada’s Arctic and rely on the environment for their livelihood. Results presented discussed adaptation initiatives being undertaken to address challenges.

12 December 2008
Inter Press Service, Faxts.com – ArcticNet Scientific Director Louis Fortier, Executive Director Martin Fortier and Board of Director Duane Smith are quoted in this article that discusses the Arctic Change 2008 conference and the importance of studying the Arctic environment. The article also references the large contingent of young scientists and managers that participated in Arctic Change. Duane Smith positively reflects on the holistic approach to science youth have incorporating local knowledge and working with communities.

12 December 2008
CTV Newsnet – ArcticNet Scientific Director Louis Fortier was interviewed live speaking on the Arctic Change 2008 conference and results released at the conference that indicate the Arctic will have its first ice free summer by 2015.

12 December 2008
La Presse – ArcticNet Network Investigator Frank Duerden participated in the Arctic Change 2008 conference and presented results from his research on the probable response of Dawson City, YK residents to anticipated changes in their physical environment. The article discusses the study’s awareness of adaptive capacity to environmental change being driven by multiple factors such as the economy and how Dawson City’s response can be used as a model for Arctic communities.

11 December 2008
RDI EN DIRECT – ArcticNet Scientific Director Louis Fortier was interviewed speaking on the signs of climate change being more noticeable at the global scale, Arctic Change 2008 as an international venue to discuss climate change, and that Inuit are among those most impacted by climate change.

11 December 2008
Radio-Canada Le téléjournal/Montréal – ArcticNet Scientific Director Louis Fortier was interviewed speaking on Arctic Change 2008 as an opportunity for scientists from around the world to discuss climate change and the Inuit participation in the meeting to provide insight into how climate change is affecting their lifestyle.

11 December 2008
La Presse – The article discusses research by Emilie Counil, ArcticNet post-doctoral fellow, who presented at Arctic Change 2008 research results from her study looking at trans-fat and its adverse health effects on residents of Nunavik. The study examined both the impacts to health and public health action that could be taken by communities.

11 December 2008
Le Soleil – Arctic Change 2008 keynote speaker David Carlson, Director of the International Programme Office for the International Polar Year office is quoted in this article on climate change impacts in the Arctic and Antarctic regions.

11 December 2008
MedIndia Online – ArcticNet Network Investigator Dr. Kue Young’s research on cancer trends among circumpolar Inuit is the subject of this article. Young presented research results at the Arctic Change 2008 conference which indicate lung cancer rates are the highest for Canadian Inuit compared to other circumpolar nations.

11 December 2008
United Press International, Times of the Internet – Arctic Change 2008 delegates released a Declaration from the conference highlighting the urgency of research results presented at the meeting and urging action to reduce and adapt to the impacts of climate change. The article highlights the Declaration and the outcomes of the conference.

10 December 2008
Radio-Canada Le téléjournal/Québec – ArcticNet Scientific Director Louis Fortier was interviewed speaking on the Arctic Change 2008 conference and the dramatic changes being observed in the Canadian Arctic. Youth from Nunavut Sivuniksavut, a high school program for Inuit youth in Ottawa, were also recorded throat-singing.

10 December 2008
Radio-Canada L’Heure du midi – ArcticNet Scientific Director Louis Fortier was interviewed speaking on the Arctic Change 2008 Conference, how scientists are worried about how quickly the Arctic is warming and the impact of climate change on Inuit communities.

10 December 2008
La Presse – ArcticNet Scientific Director Louis Fortier and Co-Chair of the Board of Directors Mary Simon are quoted in this article on climate change, its impact on Inuit, and research efforts.

10 December 2008
Le Soleil – ArcticNet Scientific Director Louis Fortier and Executive Director Martin Fortier are quoted in this article that discusses the multidisciplinary research approach employed by ArcticNet to study the impact of climate change in the Canadian Arctic. The importance of holding the Arctic Change 2008 conference to address the circumpolar-scale issues is highlighted.

10 December 2008
Le Soleil – The article provides a brief overview of the Arctic Change 2008 conference and quotes ArcticNet Scientific Director Louis Fortier.

10 December 2008
Branchez-Vouz.com – This article quotes excerpts from an interview with ArcticNet Scientific Director Louis Fortier and provides information on the Arctic Change 2008 conference.

10 December 2008
NRK – ArcticNet Investigator Kue Young and Co-Chair of the ArcticNet Board of Directors Mary Simon are quoted in this article that discusses Dr. Kue Young’s research that examined cancer trends among circumpolar Inuit. The Norwegian paper uses excerpts from the CBC and CanWest News articles on Dr. Young’s research that was presented at Arctic Change 2008.

10 December 2008
CBC Radio – Mary Simon, President of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami and Co-Chair of the ArcticNet Board of Directors, spoke about her keynote address delivered at the Arctic Change 2008 International Student Day and how Inuit are adapting to climate change.

08 December 2008
CanWest News Service, Ottawa Citizen (December 8, 2008), Dose.ca (December 8, 2008), Edmonton Journal (December 9, 2008), Global TV.com (December 8, 2008), Isuma TV Online (December 9, 2008), Montreal Gazette (December 9, 2008), Nanaimo Daily News (December 9, 2008), National Post (December 9, 2008), Vancouver Sun (December 9, 2008), Windsor Star (December 9, 2008), Yukon College Online (December 12, 2008), USA Today.com (December 9, 2008), Waterloo Record (December 9, 2008) – Dr. Kue Young, University of Toronto and ArcticNet Network Investigator, chose the Arctic Change 2008 conference as the forum to present research results on cancer rates of circumpolar Inuit. Dr. Young has found that lung cancer rates among Canada’s Inuit are the highest in the world according to research published in the Journal of Circumpolar Health. Mary Simon, President of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami and Co-Chair of the ArcticNet Board of Directors, is quoted in the article on an Inuit tobacco strategy developed to reduce the smoking rate.

08 December 2008
Globe and Mail (December 8, 2008), Edmonton Sun (December 8, 2008), Fort Francis Times Online (December 8, 2008), Kitchener-Waterloo Record Online (December 9), L’Acadie Nouvelle (December 9, 2008), Le Soleil (December 9, 2008), London Free Press (December 9, 2008), Moncton Times & Transcript (December 9, 2008), Nation Talk.ca (December 8, 2008), Red Deer Advocate (December 8, 2008), St. Catherine’s Standard (December 8, 2008) – The article provides an overview of ArcticNet Network Investigator Dr. Kue Young’s research that was presented at Arctic Change 2008 on cancer rates among circumpolar Inuit. The research found the rate of lung cancer is twice as high in circumpolar Inuit as caucasians in the United States. Dr. Young hopes the results of the study will push health agencies to consider lung cancer as an “urgent health need”.

08 December 2008
CBC.ca, E Science News.com (December 8, 2008), Silobreaker.com (December 9, 2008), Sympatico News Online (December 8, 2008), Yahoo News Online (December 8, 2008) – Dr. Kue Young, University of Toronto and ArcticNet Network Investigator, presented research results on cancer rates among circumpolar Inuit at Arctic Change 2008. The study indicates Canadian Inuit have the highest rate of lung cancer in the world, a finding blamed largely on the popularity of cigarettes in the region. The circumpolar study also found that rates of nasopharyngeal cancer — the area behind the nose — are higher among circumpolar Inuit when compared to Caucasians in the U.S.

08 December 2008
Exchange Morning Post – The article provides an overview of the Arctic Change 2008 conference, its objective and main topics to be discussed.

08 December 2008
Sermitsiaq Online – ArcticNet Network Investigator David Barber is featured in this article with a description of preliminary research results presented at Arctic Change 2008. The article in a Greenland paper highlights the results indicating that the Arctic could be seasonally ice-free by 2015.

07 December 2008
La Presse – The article provides an overview of Arctic Change 2008, a conference hosted by ArcticNet and its national and international partners. ArcticNet Executive Director Martin Fortier is quoted on the importance of bringing together researchers from the human health, social and natural sciences to discuss climate change and adaptation in the circumpolar Arctic.

05 December 2008
CanWest News Service, Winnipeg Free Press (December 5, 2008), Brockville Recorder and Times (December 6, 2008), Ottawa Citizen (December 6, 2008), Daily Bulletin (December 12, 2008), Edmonton Sun (December 6, 2008), Edmonton Sun (December 13, 2008), Hamilton Spectator (December 6, 2008), La Voix de L’Est (December 13, 2008), Le Droit (December 16, 2008), Moose Jaw Times-Herald (December 6, 2008), North Bay Nugget (December 6, 2008), The Okanagan Saturday (December 6, 2008), Ottawa Citizen (December 6, 2008), The Peterborough Examiner (December 6, 2008), Prince George Citizen (December 6, 2008), Red Deer Advocate (December 6, 2008), Regina Leader Post (December 6, 2008), Saskatoon Star Phoenix (December 5, December 9, 2008), Sault Star (December 6, 2008), St. John’s Telegram (December 13, 2008), Sudbury Star (December 6, 2008), Vancouver Sun (December 6), Victoria Times Colonist (December 6) – Dr. David Barber, University of Manitoba and ArcticNet Network Investigator, presented his preliminary findings from the Circumpolar Flaw Lead System Study at Arctic Change 2008. Preliminary findings indicate that the summer sea ice could be gone by 2015. With the reduction in sea ice, more people and industry will be attracted to the Arctic, bringing with them further impacts to the vulnerable system. The Circumpolar Flaw Lead System Study has found that everything in the marine ecosystem is affected by the reduction in sea ice with climate change.

04 December 2008
The Ring – Research conducted onboard the CCGS Amundsen, and in part funded by ArcticNet, is discussed in this article. The CCGS Amundsen was used by University of Victoria researchers to use a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) to observe the ocean floor and extract sediment samples.

04 December 2008
Au Fil des Événements – This French article provides an overview of the Arctic Change 2008 conference. Referencing ArcticNet and Université Laval as the conference hosts, the article provides information on the main discussion topics and conference web site.

14 November 2008
NBC Today Show – A television crew from the Today Show spent three weeks onboard the CCGS Amundsen during the ArcticNet expedition filming research and interviewing scientists. ArcticNet Executive Director, Martin Fortier, is quoted discussing changes observed on land and at sea. The report can be viewed online.

12 November 2008
Discovery News – ArcticNet Investigator Jean-Éric Tremblay is quoted in this article on phytoplankton research conducted with colleagues from Stanford University. Blooms of phytoplankton are increasing as the summer sea ice shrinks according to observations made using a space-borne ocean colour monitoring instrument and instrumentation onboard the CCGS Amundsen. It is not yet clear what the increase in phytoplankton will mean for the food web or carbon cycle of the Arctic.

10 November 2008
CBC News – Inuit representatives plan to present a declaration to the United Nations on the rights of Arctic peoples as it relates to sovereignty and other issues affecting the circumpolar Arctic. Mary Simon, Co-Chair of the ArcticNet Board of Directors and President of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, is quoted as saying that Inuit demand to be more fully involved in Arctic issues and that their involvement will happen as they are people who do not give up easily.

31 October 2008
CBC News – Mary Simon, Co-Chair of the ArcticNet Board of Directors and President of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, is quoted in this article on the positive appointment of Leona Aglukkaq, an Inuk and former territorial minister, to federal cabinet. Leona Aglukkaq, MP for Nunavut is the new health minister, a move that Inuit leaders hope will help the health care situation in the North.

18 October 2008
The Gazette – The experience of CCGS Amundsen Captain Lise Marchand and the unique working relationship between Coast Guard crew and scientists is described in this article. Captain Marchand is quoted as saying, “It's about giving service to the community and making it possible for science to take place."

18 October 2008
Calgary Herald, Edmonton Journal, The StarPhoenix – ArcticNet Scientific Director Louis Fortier and Network Investigator David Barber are quoted in this article that recounts the historic 15-month expedition of the CCGS Amundsen in the Canadian Arctic. With four hundred forty-eight days at sea for science, the expedition set a record for the longest time a ship has kept moving in Arctic ice year-round. The expedition gave scientists from Canada and around the world a chance to run experiments and amass data to better understand the change. Fortier is quoted as saying action is needed to minimize the impacts of the increasing human presence in the Arctic and the risks of everything from oil spills to introducing exotic species.

18 October 2008
The Gazette – The research program led by ArcticNet Network Investigator and Circumpolar Flaw Lead System Study Lead, David Barber, is discussed in this article. Using the CCGS Amundsen as a mobile research platform, the study involves Canadian researchers together with scientists from 11 other countries looking at the impact of climate change and dwindling ice cover on the flaw lead, the gap that occurs when fast-moving central ice breaks away from coastal ice. Barber is quoted as saying the reduced ice cover of the flaw lead provides "a unique laboratory from which to gain insights into the changing polar marine ecosystem.” (The article was first published September 19, 2007)

18 October 2008
The Gazette – ArcticNet Network Investigator and Lead of the Inuit Health Survey, Grace Egeland is directing a comprehensive look at the health and welfare of Inuit in Nunavut, Inuvialuit Settlement Region and Nunatsiavut communities. Utilizing the CCGS Amundsen as a travelling medical centre, the research team is collecting blood samples, testing glucose levels and bone density and looking for evidence of chronic diseases or contaminants. At the request of Inuit leaders, the study was expanded to include mental health issues, like addiction, depression and suicide, and social conditions. (The article was first published September 20, 2007)

18 October 2008
The Gazette – The article describes research undertaken from onboard the CCGS Amundsen as part of the 2007 ArcticNet Expedition to understand how ice is responding to climate change. ArcticNet Project Leader Marina Biasutti is quoted in this article on the response of Labrador Inuit to climate change and that they sometimes question why the focus is on adaptation rather than taking action on climate change. Biasutti notes that a colleague has learned to sense his snowmobile going through thin ice and react by jumping onto the surrounding ice. (The article was first published September 21, 2007)

06 October 2008
The Canadian Press, CTV.ca – Utilizing the CCGS Amundsen as a mobile research platform, the Inuit Health Survey is currently visiting Nunatsiavut (Labrador Inuit) communities. With support from ArcticNet and the International Polar Year, the Survey will undertake medical tests for conditions such as diabetes and high blood pressure. Survey participants will also be questioned on issues such as diet, mental health and community wellness. Results will be provided to individuals and synthesized for use by managers and government to improve health-care efforts.

01 October 2008
National Post, Times Colonist, The Star Phoenix, Thaindian Press – ArcticNet Scientific Director Louis Fortier and Network Investigator David Barber are quoted in this article on the Arctic ice retreat observed in 2008. Fortier comments on how scientific predictions are being realised faster than expected. The 2008 Arctic ice retreat is the second largest on record following the ice retreat observed in 2007. Barber comments on how the effect of ice loss will be felt all over the globe. Already it is affecting weather around the Northern Hemisphere.

26 September 2008
MSNBC, The Today Show – A television crew from the Today Show were onboard the CCGS Amundsen to report on climate change in the Arctic and the work of ArcticNet. The crew is onboard to collect video and conduct interviews, and to document the second time in recorded history that the Northwest Passage is ice free. The correspondent, Peter Alexander, and producer, Paul Manson, called into the Today Show on September 26, 2008 to report on their experience documenting the work of ArcticNet and ship life. The Today Show segment can be viewed here.

17 September 2008
Times Colonist, National Post – Scientists are reporting that the sea ice retreat observed in 2008 is the second greatest on record. ArcticNet Network Investigator and lead of the IPY Circumpolar Flaw Lead System Study, David Barber, notes that this year's retreat reflects the remarkable change occurring in the Arctic region and that we are on a path that will see a seasonally ice-free Arctic sometime between 2013 and 2030.

15 September 2008
CBC News – Mary Simon, President of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami and Co-Chair of the ArcticNet Board of Directors, sent the five federal political party leaders an open letter presenting twelve questions related to Arctic and Inuit issues in an attempt to understand where the parties stand on issues crucial to the Canadian agenda. Simon will embark on a cross-Canada speaking tour to raise awareness in the south and to encourage a dialogue with local candidates.

15 September 2008
Northern News Service – This article discusses the Inuit Health Survey led by ArcticNet Network Investigator Grace Egeland. The Health Survey team is currently onboard the CCGS Amundsen and will have visited communities in the Inuvialuit region, Nunavut and Nunatsiavut surveying 1,117 Inuit before the survey is complete. Health statistics will be generated. Through conversations with participants, Egeland noted that high food costs are a shared problem.

12 September 2008
Nunatsiaq News – ArcticNet Network Investigator Warwick Vincent is quoted in this article on the changes he has observed on the northwestern coast of Ellesmere Island where large sections of the Markham ice shelf have broken away. The radically different coastal marine environment may impact marine life, and air and land temperatures in the immediate area. Vincent has observed one change that highlights the adaptability of arctic fauna—red-throated loons swimming on a lake which had remained frozen year-round until recently.

05 September 2008
Nunatsiaq News – September 5, 2008 – Mary Simon, co-chair of the ArcticNet Board of Directors, says that after his four visits to the North, Prime Minister Harper now understands that Inuit need more money for education and economic development. Inuit leaders seem pleased with his efforts to comprehend and address their issues.

02 September 2008
CBC News, Carbon Positive (Netherlands) – September 2, 2008; Radio-Canada Nouvelles, National Geographic News, CNN, The Globe and Mail, InTheNews.co.uk, China Daily (China), Toronto Sun, eFluxMedia, RedOrbit (TX, USA), Reuters (India), Scotsman (UK), USA Today, BBC News (UK), shortNews.com (Germany), Channel 4 News (UK), 3 News (NZ), New Zealand – September 3, 2008; The Associated Press, ABC Online (Australia), CBC.ca, Telegraph.co.uk – September 4, 2008 – Warwick Vincent, ArcticNet Network Investigator, and Derek Mueller, member of ArcticNet, and other polar scientists are featured in a series of articles relating the further breakup and detachment of ice shelves from Ellesmere Island. Canada has lost more than 90% of its ice shelves in the past century. This loss means that rare ecosystems that depend on them are on the brink of extinction. Just this summer, the Markham Ice Shelf, measuring 50 km², detached itself from the island and is now adrift. The Serson Ice Shelf lost 122 km² of ice which represents 60% of its total area.

01 September 2008
Canwest News Service – September 1, 2008 – Norm Catto, ArcticNet Network Investigator, is featured in this article about Canada’s shrinking coastline due to rising sea levels and storm surges. Catto warns that coasts prone to floods will see worse flooding as sea levels rise. These changes will impact coastal communities and Canadians must be ready to cope with this phenomenon.

29 August 2008
The Daily Star, Lebanon – August 29, 2008 – ArcticNet Network Investigator, Gary Stern, is cited in this article written by one of the journalists invited by the World Federation of Science Journalists to join the scientific expedition onboard the CCGS Amundsen. The journalist describes some of the research activities on the ship.

28 August 2008
Canwest News Service; The Canadian Press – August 28, 2008 – Mary Simon, co-chair of the ArcticNet Board of Directors, says that if the Conservatives want to see the North develop, they will have to consider "the human dimension". Simon appreciates P.M. Harper's repeated visits to the North and his will to understand Inuit issues. The articles relate the government’s announcement to name the new Canadian icebreaker John G. Diefenbaker and its initiatives to secure the North.

27 August 2008
Webwire – August 27, 2008 – ArcticNet Network Investigator, Gordon McBean, is cited in this article which announces that McGill is funding research from the Canadian Foundation for Climate and Atmospheric Sciences that will provide decision-makers the scientific tools needed to face new challenges associated with climate change. One research project will estimate the fate of Arctic permafrost, as well as assess the performance of climate models to improve forecasts of permafrost distribution.

22 August 2008
Globe and Mail – August 22, 2008 – Mary Simon, co-chair of the ArcticNet Board of Directors, is mentioned in this article written by Canada’s former Foreign Affairs Minister, Llyod Axworthy. Axworthy proposes that Canada’s role in dealing with Arctic issues should be to persuade other Arctic nations to switch from a competitive model to one based on co-operation.

22 August 2008
Canwest News Service – August 22, 2008 – Michael Byers, ArcticNet Network Investigator, is cited in this article featuring Operation Nanook, the biggest Arctic sovereignty exercise in Canadian history. The purpose of the exercise is to test Canada's response to emergency scenarios and to showcase Canada's sovereignty. According to Byers, Canada’s biggest challenge in responding to disasters will be response time.

18 August 2008
Calgary Herald – August 18, 2008 – Michael Byers, ArcticNet Network Investigator, expresses concern that should Canada should be building its capacity to police and protect the Northwest Passage. Canada is trying to assert its title as keeper of this Passage, but the consensus amongst specialists is that not enough is being done to control and protect these waters.

16 August 2008
Ottawa Citizen; The Gazette – August 16, 2008 – Mary Simon, co-chair of the ArcticNet Board of Directors, and Michael Byers, Network Investigator, are cited in this article relating the government’s stance on the Canadian Arctic. Specialists suggest that the government clarify how it will co-ordinate policy for a wide scope of issues ranging from resource exploitation, Inuit health and culture, navigation, military obligations, and marine pollution.

15 August 2008
The Globe and Mail - August 15, 2008 – Bruno Tremblay, ArcticNet Network Investigator, explains that a former research proposal to find Sir John Franklin's lost ships was refused, so he and other Arctic researchers pitched in as a spinoff of their own research. A new project will now begin as a result of the persistence of these researchers and Canadian researchers will combine efforts to find the remains of Sir John Franklin's expedition.

11 August 2008
CBC News – August 11, 2008 – Grace Egeland, ArcticNet Network Investigator, leads this year’s Inuit health survey which includes Inuit living outside Nunavut, including the Inuvialuit of the Northwest Territories and Inuit living in the Nunatsiavut region of Labrador. The former survey covered 18 coastal communities in Nunavut. Inuit and Inuvialuit are invited to fill out a survey concerning their health, nutrition, lifestyle and well-being.

29 July 2008
Radio Canada, radio news – July 29, 2008 – On the morning news, Louis Fortier, ArcticNet’s Scientific Director, spoke of how climate change is impacting the Arctic, his career path and his personal motivations.

29 July 2008
Globe and Mail - July 29, 2008 – Warwick Vincent, ArcticNet Network Investigator, and Derek Mueller, member of ArcticNet, provide details on the four-square-kilometre chunk that has broken off the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf, the largest remaining ice shelf in the Arctic. These experts express concern over the possible disappearance of Arctic ice shelves and the associated ecosystems such as epishelf lakes.

28 July 2008
Le Soleil – July 28, 2008 – Louis Fortier, ArcticNet’s Scientific Director, is featured in this article as the laureate of the Le Soleil–Radio-Canada award and his newly obtained title of Officer from the Ordre national du Québec. This second award is the highest distinction given by the Québec government. These awards underscore his exemplary contribution to science and oceanography and his devotion to public awareness of scientific issues.

24 July 2008
The Canadian Press – July 24, 2008 – Gordon McBean, ArcticNet Network Investigator, is cited in this article featuring the upcoming release of Health Canada’s report on health forecasts related to climate change and the increased risk of injuries, illnesses and stress-related disorders brought on by more frequent extreme weather events. McBean is one of the report’s authors.

21 July 2008
Canwest News – July 21, 2008 – Mary Simon, co-chair of the ArcticNet Board of Directors, denounced "third-world conditions" in some northern communities and asked the Prime Minister to invite aboriginal leaders to his next meeting with the premiers. Simon wrote to Harper requesting that three issues - an initiative for aboriginals, economic policy and climate change - be addressed in the first ministers’ agenda this fall.

18 July 2008
The London Free Press - July 18, 2008 – Gordon McBean, ArcticNet Network Investigator, says the city of London may not be an environmental leader yet, but it's on the right track path toward combating and coping with climate change. Through various initiatives, the city’s officials are working on energy sustainability and on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions.

17 July 2008
Nature, News Feature, Vol 454 – July 17, 2008 – The research of David Barber and Yves Gratton, ArcticNet Network Investigators, is featured in this article describing the research conducted onboard the current CCGS Amundsen expedition, known as the Circumpolar Flaw Lead System Study. Barber is cited describing flaw lead systems. Christopher J. Mundy, ArcticNet Postdoctoral Fellow, is also featured in the article.

17 July 2008
The Canadian Press – July 16, 2008; Globe and Mail – July 17, 2008 – Mary Simon, Inuit leader and co-chair of the ArcticNet Board of Directors, said the time has come to address education as a key priority to preserve and enhance Inuit languages and cultures. This was said while Canada's premiers are asking the Prime Minister to build on his apology to survivors of residential schools by meeting with the provinces to address the various social problems afflicting the country's native communities and to focus on youth issues, such as education.

16 July 2008
CBCnews.ca – July 16, 2008 – Lucette Barber, co-ordinator of the ArcticNet Schools on Board outreach program, is cited in this article relating the task of Vincent Ho, Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra's composer-in-residence. Ho is currently onboard the CCGS Amundsen to compose a symphony which is expected to debut at the opening of the 2010 Winnipeg New Music Festival. The symphony is to be inspired from his travels in the Arctic and experience onboard the research vessel.

15 July 2008
The Canadian Press – July 15, 2008 – A study reveals that levels of toxic chemicals in many animals across the Arctic are finally dropping. The team of Laurie Chan, ArcticNet Network Investigator, found that levels of southern pollutants poisoning the traditional foods of northerners are decreasing. However, mercury contamination remains a problem and other aspects such as caribou, common in Inuit diet, have yet to be studied.

14 July 2008
The Canadian Press – July 14, 2008 – ArcticNet Network Investigator, Michael Byers, is featured in this article. The article describes the work of Canadian scientists going to Devon Island to test a new generation of high-tech detectors, called CANDISS, intended to watch over the increasingly busy northern waters. Ships trying to sneak through the Northwest Passage should be detected by CANDISS.

12 July 2008
The Canadian Press – July 12, 2008 – Gordon McBean, ArcticNet Network Investigator, encouraged ministers of the provincial municipalities to improve building codes to better address concerns related to climate change. McBean, a climate expert, requests that new homes be built to better withstand a growing risk of tornadoes in the Prairie Provinces.

11 July 2008
The Canadian Press – July 11, 2008; Leader-Post – July 16, 2008; Calgary Herald – July 17, 2008; Canwest News Service, Canada.com – July 17, 2008; The Province – July 20, 2008 – ArcticNet Network Investigator, Gordon McBean, suggests municipalities improve their building codes to better address concerns related to climate change. McBean, a climate expert, proposes that new homes be built to better withstand a growing risk of excessive rain and heat, heavy snow and devastating winds in the Prairie Provinces. McBean also warns that the frequency and intensity of severe weather incidents are expected to increase.

10 July 2008
AlterNet, www.alternet.org – July 10, 2008 – Michael Byers, ArcticNet Network Investigator, is cited in this article which provides an overview of the challenges the Arctic faces with its changing environment and emerging economic opportunities. Byers expresses concern over Canada’s ability to control the ships crossing the Northwest Passage and to clean up if spills occur.

08 July 2008
EOS, Vol 89 No 28 - July 8, 2008 – Warwick Vincent, ArcticNet Network Investigator, is mentioned in this news article featuring Margaret Munro. Munro received the 2008 David Perlman Award for Excellence in Science Journalism thanks to her article: “Ice Shelf Collapse Sends Chill,” which chronicles research conducted by ArcticNet researchers on the collapse of an ice shelf on Ellesmere Island.

03 July 2008
The London Free Press – July 3, 2008 – This article announces a talk that will be given by Gordon McBean, ArcticNet Network Investigator. The article also underscores McBean’s esteemed expertise in the field of climate change impacts. The talk will be part of the North America 2030: An Environmental Outlook conference and will cover some implications of climate change on Canada and the Arctic, and the northern U.S.

02 July 2008
The Globe and Mail – July 2, 2008 – Michael Byers, ArcticNet Network Investigator, is cited in this article which relates the efforts deployed to map out areas that have long been disputed. In order to resolve which country owns certain areas of the Arctic continental shelves, more data must be obtained. According to Byers, "You can't have a rational conversation about this issue until you know what's under the ocean". With the current lack of Arctic seismic information, countries do not have adequate data to support their land claims to the UN. This has led to exploration efforts such as the Canada-U.S. project and Canada's collaboration with Denmark to prove the Lomonosov Ridge originates in North America and not Eurasia.

30 June 2008
The Globe and Mail – June 30, 2008 – Inuit leader and co-chair of the ArcticNet Board of Directors, Mary Simon, is cited sharing the concerns of northern premiers on the proposed Liberal carbon tax plan. The premiers feel this tax would hurt the diesel-dependent territories without improving Canada's overall climate-change record. Simon also mentioned that the Liberals failed to consult the Inuit before unveiling the plan.

28 June 2008
Montreal Gazette – June 28, 2008 – Martin Sharp, ArcticNet Network Investigator, is cited in this article which describes the glacier research conducted on the Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut. Sharp explains that the Devon Ice Cap is much like the Greenland ice sheet, but at a much smaller scale. According to him, the Devon Ice Cap is an easier place to measure and tease out the glacier dynamics at work and lessons learned on Devon are expected to help improve forecasts of what is in store for Greenland.

27 June 2008
elEconomista.es – June 27; Reuters, UK - June 28, 2008; CBCnews.ca – July 1, 2008 – Mary Simon, Inuit leader and co-chair of the ArcticNet Board of Directors, wore a sealskin outfit on Canada Day to celebrate her Inuit culture. She called for Canadians who support them to wear seal clothing in a show of solidarity to Inuit and other sealers on Canada Day. She reminded those who called for a ban on seal products in the European Union that Inuit are still living their own culture and have their own identity and way of life.

25 June 2008
The Globe and Mail - June 25, 2008 – In this article, ArcticNet Network Investigator Michael Byers expects a federal advisory panel to recommend a sort of “national security test” as part of Canada's foreign investment review process when it reports to the federal government in the upcoming days. Since 9/11, Byers feels that foreign investors should expect such restrictions.

25 June 2008
The London Free Press – June 25, 2008 – Gordon McBean, ArcticNet Network Investigator, was honoured at a reception for his work on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. This award is shared with former U.S. vice-president Al Gore and 200 Canadian scientists and about 1,000 scientists from around the world.

24 June 2008
Canada.com, CanWest News Service – June 24, 2008; CBCnews.ca – July 2, 2008 – ArcticNet Network Investigator, Gordon McBean, is interviewed in this article relating the open letter written by Canadian Climate Science Leaders to the prime minister, opposition leaders and premiers. The letter was signed by 130 climate scientists including 20 ArcticNet researchers. The intention of the letter is to refocus attention on the government's role in addressing the looming threat of climate change. McBean organized the letter and urges the government to make climate change issues a national priority.

23 June 2008
Canada.com, CanWest News Service – June 23, 2008 – In this article ArcticNet Network Investigator, David Barber, is cited making dire predictions for this summer’s Arctic sea-ice. A trio of young Scandinavian royals and scientists set off from the Svalbard Islands on a pole-bound icebreaker mission to make first-hand observations of the melting North Pole. Barber expects they will witness dramatic changes to the Arctic landscape such as large ice-free expanses.

20 June 2008
Nunatsiaq News – June 20, 2008 – Duane Smith, member of the ArcticNet board of directors, is cited in this article describing the intention of Inuit leaders from across the circumpolar world to gather in Kuujjuaq in November to plan a response to the race for territory and resources by Arctic nations. The need for Inuit to actively participate in such talks is pressing.

20 June 2008
Nunatsiaq News; Indian Country Today – June 20, 2008 – Inuit leader Mary Simon, co-chair of the ArcticNet Board of Directors, spoke at the House of Commons after the Prime Minister’s apology on behalf of the nation for the residential school ordeal. Simon said she hoped the apology sparks an eventual improvement in the quality of life of aboriginal people in Canada. The event also symbolized Canada's commitment to reconciliation and building a new relationship with aboriginal people.

20 June 2008
National Geographic News – June 20, 2008 – David Barber, ArcticNet Network Investigator, is cited in this article featuring predictions for an ice-free North Pole. It seems, however, that the melt would be mostly symbolic seeing as thicker ice would not melt but would instead be pushed against the Canadian continental shelf by weather and the Earth's rotation. The unusually cold winter had raised scientists’ hopes for a recovery of Arctic sea-ice, but the newly formed ice has already started to break up since it froze later than usual. Barber says that his team jokingly calls perennial ice an “endangered species".

20 June 2008
Nunatsiaq News – June 20, 2008 – Gilles Gauthier, ArcticNet Network Investigator, is featured in this article which relates research conducted by Gauthier on snowy owls in the Canadian Arctic. In an effort to better understand the phenology of this Arctic bird, Gauthier and his team attached satellite transmitters on to 12 adult female owls last summer. The results were quite surprising and researchers now plan to compare their routes with satellite images to see if the owls stayed around the polynyas.

18 June 2008
Press Release, Québec Premier’s website (http://www.premier-ministre.gouv.qc.ca/salle-de-presse/communiques/2008/juin/2008-06-18.shtml) - June 18, 2008 – Louis Fortier, ArcticNet’s scientific director, was awarded the title of Officer from the Ordre national du Québec. This award is the highest distinction given by the Québec government and is bestowed upon distinguished notables who have contributed in an exemplary fashion to the development of Québec and who have enabled Québec to shine regionally, nationally or internationally. The event was highlighted in the media, notably by TVA and Nouvelles RDI (CBC).

16 June 2008
Ottawa Citizen; The National Post; CBCNews.ca; CBC.ca; The Globe and Mail - June 11, 2008; 980 CJME News Talk Radio, Saskatchewan; Nanaimo Daily News, BC; Section15.ca; Toronto Star; Winnipeg Free Press; The London Free Press – June 12, 2008; Northern News Online; Canada.com – June 13, 2008; The StarPhoenix; AFP; Nanaimo Daily News, BC – June 16, 2008 – Inuit leader Mary Simon, co-chair of the ArcticNet Board of Directors, spoke at the House of Commons after the Prime Minister’s apology. The PM apologized on behalf of the nation for the residential school ordeal. Simon said the event paved the way for healing and progress. The event also symbolized Canada's commitment to reconciliation and building a new relationship with aboriginal people.

12 June 2008
The Globe and Mail - June 12, 2008 – Michael Byers, ArcticNet Network Investigator, wrote a commentary about the Prime Minister’s apology and suggested that the Prime Minister also apologize for the “High Arctic exiles”. According to Byers, this would not only be the right thing to do, but it would also help cement Canada's northern claims for sovereignty.

06 June 2008
Nunatsiaq News – June 6, 2008 – In this article Duane Smith, member of the ArcticNet board of directors, notes that the five governments attending the international Arctic summit held in Greenland failed to invite Inuit and other groups to take part in future talks. At the summit, the Arctic nations agreed that the existing treaties can resolve claims.

02 June 2008
NPR news, Day to Day www.NPR.org – June 2, 2008. – Michael Byers, ArcticNet Network Investigator, is interviewed about the international Arctic summit that was held in Greenland. According to Byers, the summit reaffirmed that all countries will continue to cooperate and work within the (United Nations) Law of the Sea framework.

30 May 2008
The Ottawa Citizen - May 30, 2008 – Participants of the international Arctic summit, Greenland, concluded that science and international law will now resolve which country owns which parts of the Arctic seabed. Michael Byers, ArcticNet Network Investigator, states that if science supports it, the only thing stopping Canada from claiming undersea territory beyond the North Pole would be a negotiated agreement among Canada, Russia, Denmark, Norway and the U.S. to limit claims to extended continental shelves to 350 nautical miles from shore. The Law of the Sea convention should prevail and respective land claims based on science will be accepted.

30 May 2008
Nunatsiaq News – May 30, 2008 – Research conducted by an ArcticNet post-doctoral fellow, Émilie Counil, showed high levels of trans fats in the blood of 888 Nunavik residents. These levels were three times higher than that found among 524 Greenlandic Inuit. This discrepancy is explained by Denmark's ban on trans fat in store-bought foods. Nunavik also hopes to limit the amount of trans fats coming into the region.

28 May 2008
The Canadian Press – May 28, 2008; The Canadian Press – May 23, 2008 – The views of Michael Byers, ArcticNet Network Investigator, are expressed in this article which provides information on the international Arctic summit being held in Greenland. Representatives from Canada, Denmark, Russia, Norway and the United States will gather to discuss issues from climate change to increasing resource exploitation. The summit is organized with the intention of setting the momentum for cooperation and work within the (United Nations) Law of the Sea framework.

26 May 2008
Canwest News Service, canada.com – May 26, 2008 – In this article, an expert warns that Danish-Canadian relations may be challenged if issues such as seabed claims, pressures over Greenland's home-rule status, and fishing rights are discussed at the Arctic summit in Greenland. On the other hand, ArcticNet Network Investigator Michael Byers is quite optimistic of the summit’s outcome and believes that the two countries’ Arctic interests may concur.

25 May 2008
Canwest News Service, canada.com – May 25, 2008 – ArcticNet Network Investigator Michael Byers is mentioned in this article which discusses the results from a joint Canadian-Danish study of the Lomonosov Ridge. The findings suggest that the massive undersea rock formation could be considered part of Canada's territory, supporting the bid to extend the Canadian continental shelf in the high Arctic. According to the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, scientific proof is needed to justify that subsea terrain is a continuation of a country's continental shelf. This study, if published, may provide such scientific proof.

23 May 2008
Toronto Star, thestar.com – May 23, 2008 – Michael Byers, ArcticNet Network Investigator, writes an article on Canada’s decision to send its Natural Resources Minister rather than its Foreign Minister Maxime Bernier to an international Arctic summit in Greenland. The primary aim of the summit is for all five countries bordering the Arctic Ocean – Canada, Norway, Russia, and the United States – to reaffirm their commitment to co-operation and existing international law.

21 May 2008
Canwest News Service, Canada.com – May 21, 2008 – Michael Byers, ArcticNet Network Investigator, is quoted in this article which announces an international summit in Greenland and the need for Canada to actively participate. The summit aims to ease territorial tensions and to chart a peaceful future for the Arctic. Byers believes that the “trajectory of Arctic politics” for the coming decades could be determined at this summit.

19 May 2008
The Hill Times - May 19, 2008 – The role played by Michael Byers, ArcticNet Network Investigator, in the blocking of the sale of MacDonald, Dettwiler and Associates to an American firm is mentioned in this article. Byers noted that the foreign affairs minister held statutory power over the use and sale of RADARSAT-II. The recommendations made by the House Industry, Science and Technology Committee also played a critical role in influencing Jim Prentice’s decision.

16 May 2008
Winnipeg Free Press – May 16, 2008 – Joanne Keselman, member of the ArcticNet Board of Directors, was appointed to the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC). The SSHRC is an independent federal government agency which funds university-based research and graduate training through national peer-reviewed competitions. Keselman is a psychology professor at the University of Manitoba, has an expertise in research administration, and is a member of several associations.

14 May 2008
Macleans.ca – May 14, 2008; National Post – May 15, 2008 – The United States has declared the polar bear a "threatened" species under the Endangered Species Act. Mary Simon, co-chair on the ArcticNet Board of Directors, met with the Interior Secretary Dirk Kempthorne and Canada's Environment Minister John Baird last week and they pledged to work together to ensure the polar bear populations thrive into the future. This decision from the U.S. may engender economic hardship in traditional Inuit communities whose revenues depend on guiding and outfitting hunting parties. In Canada, polar bear population statuses vary amongst sub-populations and decision makers are waiting for more scientific results. More aggressive actions may be taken when dealing with the more fragile sub-populations.

14 May 2008
En.wikinews.org; Mensnewsdaily.com – May 14, 2008 – ArcticNet and Louis Fortier, Scientific Director, are mentioned in this article which features the United States’ listing of the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act. Polar bear populations may be threatened because of the loss of their habitat, Arctic sea ice. Climate change impacts are causing the sea ice to melt at unprecedented rates.

12 May 2008
Northern News Services - May 12, 2008 – To date, Inuit are satisfied with the efforts of the Indian Residential Schools Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Mary Simon, ITK president and co-chair on the ArcticNet Board of Directors, is on the selection panel for the two commissioners who have yet to be chosen. The commission will officially begin its work on June 1.

02 May 2008
The Globe and Mail, www.theglobeandmail.com – May 2, 2008 – ArcticNet Network Investigator Michael Byers is quoted in this article which relates MDA’s lobbying in Ottawa for a chance to plead its case for the sale to a US company. Byers states that the report written by a parliamentary committee urging the federal Industry Minister Jim Prentice to stand by his decision to reject the sale may be quite useful in supporting this decision.

30 April 2008
Salon.com, USA - April 30, 2008 – Several ArcticNet Network Investigators are featured in this article which focuses on contaminants and how they make their way from the air, ice and water up the food web to Northern people. Gary A. Stern, Robie Macdonald, David Barber, and Derek Muir are the ArcticNet Investigators quoted on their work in the natural sciences sector. Eric Dewailly and Grace Egeland are referred to for their work in the health sciences sector. Jesse Carrie, ArcticNet PhD student, and his work on contaminants in the ice are also mentioned.

25 April 2008
NERC Press, www.nerc.ac.uk/press/releases/2008 - April 25, 2008 – Schools on Board, an outreach programme of ArcticNet, is featured in this article which recites the experiences of a student and teacher from Liverpool, England. They boarded the Amundsen to experience Arctic research hands on and learn about the diverse Inuit culture and how climate change is affecting them. Students and teachers from Spain, China, Canada and the USA were also part of the programme.

24 April 2008
The Christian Science Monitor, csmonitor.com - April 24, 2008 – ArcticNet collaborator Jody Deming and Dave Barber, Network Investigator, are mentioned in this article which features Deming’s work onboard the Amundsen. Deming is studying microscopic algae in sea ice and is seeing some analogs with extraterrestrial life.

17 April 2008
Au fil des événements, Université Laval – April 17,2008 – Émilie Counil, ArcticNet post-doctoral fellow, and Éric Dewailly, Network Investigator, are featured in an article about Inuit health and the issue of trans fats in their diet. Counil studied Inuit from Greenland and from Nunavik and established that Nunavik Inuit had higher levels of trans fats in their blood. This was attributed to the availability of trans fatty foods in local food stores. Inuit from Greenland apparently consume more traditional food and the importation of food is also regulated in order to decrease the amount of trans fats. Such restrictions will soon be implemented in Nunavik.

16 April 2008
CBC.ca – April 16, 2008; Northern News Services – April 17, 2008 – Co-chair on the ArcticNet Board of Directors and Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami President, Mary Simon, is quoted in this article featuring the national Inuit education summit held in Inuvik. Educators met to discuss ways to improve education for the Inuit. Simon stated that successful programs were those which focused on Inuit language, culture and curriculum. Educators, the Inuit, and children must all work together to achieve a widespread, high level of education.

13 April 2008
Toronto Star, TheStar.com – April 13, 2008 – ArcticNet Network Investigator, Dave Barber, is interviewed in this article. Barber discusses the multidisciplinary approach recently adopted by Arctic researchers. Working together and sharing research facilities, such as the Amundsen, increases the overall understanding of the Arctic ecosystem in addition to being cost efficient.

13 April 2008
Toronto Star, TheStar.com – April 13, 2008 – An article written by Toronto Star science reporter Peter Calamai quotes ArcticNet’s Scientific Director Louis Fortier, Executive Director Martin Fortier, and Network Investigator Dave Barber. The article relates the scientific and economic advantages of working and exchanging results on the Amundsen icebreaker. The ship based research offers the opportunity to actively exchange with colleagues from various disciplines and link observations.

12 April 2008
The Canadian Press - April 11, 2008; Sudbury Star - Sudbury; Globe and Mail; TheStar.com – April 12, 2008; CBC.ca – April 16, 2008 – Scientists discovered extensive new cracks in the largest remaining Arctic ice shelf (Ward Hunt Ice Shelf) and suggest another polar landmark seems destined to break up and disappear. Derek Mueller, researcher at Trent U and ArcticNet member, is part of the patrol of Canadian Rangers and got an up-close look at the cracks in the ice shelves. Mueller states that these break ups have changed the map of Canada.

11 April 2008
CNW Group – April 9, 2008; First Perspective, National Aboriginal News – April 11, 2008 – Mary Simon, co-chair on the ArcticNet Board of Directors and Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami President, is cited in these articles relating the House of Commons' decision to pass a resolution endorsing the UN Declaration and to call on the Government to "fully implement the standards contained therein". According to Simon, “the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples provides a road map for the reconciliation of Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Canada and around the world”.

10 April 2008
CBC.ca; Vancouver Sun; Straight.com - April 10, 2008 – Michael Byers, ArcticNet Network Investigator, is featured in this article discussing the lack of affordable housing in Vancouver. UBC students have drafted a human-rights complaint that will be filed against Canada before the United Nations. The lack of affordable housing is viewed as a violation of human rights.

10 April 2008
National Post; Vancouver Sun; Globe and Mail – April 10, 2008 – Ottawa plans to block the sale of MacDonald, Dettwiler and Associates Ltd., a Canadian aerospace firm that developed a key surveillance satellite, to a U.S. company. This may be part of the answer to the government's dilemma balancing the issue of national security without deterring foreign investment, says Michael Byers, ArcticNet Network Investigator.

07 April 2008
Northern News Services – April 7, 2008 – Schools on Board, an outreach program of ArcticNet, is featured in this article which relates the experience of a student, Alison Kopalie of Qikiqtarjuaq, and science teacher, Susie Hawkins from Inuksuit school, aboard the CCGS Amundsen at a special location off Banks Island. The trip was rich with learning experiences which will be shared at their local schools.

06 April 2008
Canadian Mining Journal – April 6, 2008 – James Ford, ArcticNet postdoctoral fellow, Tristan Pearce, ArcticNet research associate, and Frank Duerden, ArcticNet Network Investigator, authored this article on climate change impacts on the Canadian mining sector. ARCTICNORTH CONSULTING and stakeholders from the mining industry are conducting a project to examine current and potential impacts of climate change on the mining sector, and will outline adaptation strategies that could be implemented to mitigate these impacts.

05 April 2008
Toronto Star, TheStar.com – April 5, 2008 – ArcticNet is acknowledged in this text as being partially responsible for providing top university and government experts the opportunity to conduct research on climate change in the Arctic. The article describes some of the research conducted onboard through descriptions of some of the students’ projects. Biology professor Christian Nozais, ArcticNet Investigator, has a Master’s student onboard studying mesofauna, microscopic creatures living in and under the Arctic sea ice.

03 April 2008
CBC News, CBC North – April 3, 2008 – Andrew Derocher, ArcticNet Network Investigator who studies polar bears, is featured in this article. The text relates the shooting of three polar bears who wandered into the community of Déline, Northwest Territories. The bears wandered more than 400 km away from their usual habitat on the Beaufort Sea.

03 April 2008
Au fil des événements, Université Laval – April 3, 2008 – Warwick Vincent and Connie Lovejoy, both ArcticNet Network Investigators, are featured in this article which describes the expedition Operation Nunalivut 08. The objectives of this 1000km expedition from Eureka to Ward Hunt Island, NU, are to collect data on the ice shelves of Ellesmere Island and samples of living organisms associated with the shelves. Derek Mueller and Andrew Hamilton, past members of ArcticNet, are part of the expedition.

31 March 2008
Toronto Star, TheStar.com – March 31, 2008 – ArcticNet Network Investigators, Tim Papakyriakou, Yves Gratton, and Dave Barber are mentioned in this article relating the difficult decisions being taken aboard the Amundsen. The icebreaker will soon dislodge from its frozen berth and head farther west. The move is a gamble because of the unpredictable weather and often capricious ice movements.

30 March 2008
Toronto Star, TheStar.com – March 30, 2008 – Chief scientist onboard the Amundsen and ArcticNet Network Investigator, Tim Papakyriakou, is cited in this article featuring the dimming of lights on the Amundsen last Saturday. The gesture had added significance because the icebreaker’s research expedition focuses on understanding Arctic climate change. The goal of Earth Hour was to draw public attention to the urgency of climate change.

29 March 2008
Toronto Sun – March 29, 2008 – Pita Aatami, member of the ArcticNet Board of Directors and President of Makivik Corporation, is mentioned in this article. The article discusses the Inuit land-claim deal recently approved. Several islands included in the land settlement will have to be named and Aatami hinted that one may very well carry the prime minister's name.

27 March 2008
Radio Canada, Nouvelles (radio) – March 27, 2008 – Reinhard Pienitz, ArcticNet Network Investigator, is interviewed during the morning news to discuss potential solutions for the problem of blue-green algae in lakes surrounding the Québec City area.

26 March 2008
Toronto Star, thestar.com – March 26, 2008 – Yves Gratton, ArcticNet Network Investigator, is cited in this article which features research onboard the Amundsen. Gratton heads the physical oceanography group, one of the ten research teams involved in the Amundsen's current mission.

26 March 2008
The Globe and Mail, globeandmail.com – March 26, 2008 – Mary Simon, president of the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami and co-chair of the ArcticNet Board of Directors, writes an article addressing the government’s lack of collaboration with the Inuit in the advancement of its plans to develop the Arctic. Simon wants her people’s message to be heard loud and clear: “The front-line role of managing the Canadian Arctic should be entrusted to the peoples of the Canadian Arctic”.

26 March 2008
CBC News, The National (television)– March 26, 2008 – ArcticNet Network Investigator, Warwick F. Vincent, was interviewed concerning the partial break-up of the Wilkins Ice Shelf in Antarctica. Climate change is provoking these dramatic events which are occurring in both Polar Regions at rates faster than predicted.

26 March 2008
TQS and Radio Canada Le Téléjournal Québec (television) - March 26, 2008; CBC News Toronto (radio and television) – March 27, 2008; Radio Canada La Semaine Verte (television) – March 29-30, 2008 – ArcticNet’s Scientific Director Louis Fortier was interviewed about the partial break-up of the Wilkins Ice Shelf in Antarctica. As in the Arctic, the Antarctic is experiencing an acceleration of events that can be attributed to climate change.

24 March 2008
National Post – March 24, 2008 – Michael Byers, ArcticNet Network Investigator, co-writes an article underscoring the importance and relevance of Canada conserving its RADARSAT-2 technology. The newly launched remote sensing satellite, designed specifically with Arctic sovereignty in mind, generates high definition imagery even at night and through clouds, making it the perfect tool for tracking ships and mapping sea-ice. RADASAT-2 was developed through a partnership between MacDonald Dettwiler & Associates (MDA) and the Canadian Space Agency. The proposed sale of the space division of B.C.-based MDA to Alliant Techsystems of Minnesota is awaiting approval from Industry Minister Jim Prentice.

21 March 2008
Toronto Star, thestar.com – March 21, 2008 – ArcticNet Network Investigator, Tim Papakyriakou, is featured in this article as the chief scientist onboard the Amundsen. The article relates the difficult route undertaken by the ship over the past few days, struggling with ice jams and getting stuck. The next two weeks will be spent south of Banks Island, with scientists continuing to conduct scores of experiments to understand rapid Arctic climate change.

17 March 2008
The Star.com– March 17, 2008 – Tim Papakyriakoi, ArcticNet Network Investigator and chief scientist for the current stage of the Amundsen expedition, is cited in this article featuring the research plans that had to be altered due to the absence of the formation of an ice bridge. Scientists had intended to travel to a semi-permanent base by snowmobile from the Amundsen, which was supposed to be moored nearby, sheltered in the fixed ice behind an ice bridge. This bridge never formed and thus caused scientists to modify their strategy.

12 March 2008
CBC News, Tech Bytes– March 12, 2008 – The journalist onboard the Amundsen, Emily Chung, relays information about her experience. She was lucky during her last days onboard and got to see a spectacular display of Northern light as well as a baby seal poking its head through the ship’s moon pool.

11 March 2008
National Post - March 11, 2008 – ArcticNet Network Investigator, Michael Byers, is mentioned in this article which warns of the increasing potential for conflict over Arctic resources at an international level. The warning is part of a document prepared for a summit of 27 European heads of government and relates the expected impacts of global climate change.

10 March 2008
CBC News, Tech Bytes– March 10, 2008 – Stories on the research conducted onboard the Amundsen are described in this article. ArcticNet graduate student Dustin Isleifson recalls that earlier on the Amundsen, the cage he was on was lowered a little too much and he was dunked up to neck deep in the icy waters. Fortunately, he was wearing a waterproof immersion suit. Gary Stern, ArcticNet Network Investigator, the boat captain, and a journalist travel by helicopter to find a suitable location for an ice camp.

08 March 2008
Winnipeg Free Press - March 8, 2008 – The time lag between data collection, its analysis and the publication of results may mean that the research being conducted may constitute far too little, far too late, according to this article. Climatologist Dave Barber, ArcticNet Network Investigator, is featured describing the lag between climate-change modelling and climate change reality this past January.

08 March 2008
CBC News, Tech Bytes– March 8, 2008 – ArcticNet student, Gérald Darnis, is featured in this article which relates zooplankton sampling onboard the Amundsen. The journalist, along with students from the Schools on Board program, observed his sampling methods and the organisms he collected.

07 March 2008
United Press International, USA - March 7, 2008 – Gordon McBean, ArcticNet Investigator, is cited in this article referring to the soon-to-be released federal report written by more than 100 Canadian scientists. McBean warns that Canadian roads and bridges will take a beating and coastal erosion will speed up. He stresses that when investing in infrastructure, we should focus on the climate of the future, and not the climate of the past. On a brighter note, some wine-producing regions will benefit from longer and hotter summers.

07 March 2008
CBC News, Tech Bytes– March 7, 2008 – Gary Stern, ArcticNet Network Investigator and chief scientist on the Amundsen, is mentioned as the scientist who welcomed journalist Emily Chung onboard. Chung is going to spend seven days onboard the ship and report on the research conducted.

06 March 2008
Ottawa Citizen – March 6, 2008 – Michael Byers, ArcticNet Network Investigator, writes this article on the "model negotiation" he organized to delineate a path for talks between Canada and the US on the subject of the Northwest Passage. By the end of the mock negotiation, nine recommendations were made. With climate change and consequent increased navigation, the recommendations address the issues of heightened security and environmental risks, of listening to and supporting Canada's northern peoples, and reaching out to other countries with diplomacy. This exercise was funded by ArcticNet.

06 March 2008
National News, CD98.9 NewsCentre – March 6, 2008 – Gordon McBean, ArcticNet Investigator, is cited in this article relating the results from the soon-to-be released federal report written by more than 100 Canadian scientists. The report speaks of climate change and increased extreme weather events in Canada. McBean warns of higher insurance claims as homes and property suffer damage. He also says Canadian roads, bridges, and other infrastructure will be impacted.

05 March 2008
Winnipeg Free Press - March 5, 2008 – The adventures of research onboard the Amundsen are described in this article which mentions Gary Stern, ArcticNet Network Investigator. The article describes the challenges of working in the Arctic, with wacky weather conditions and the unpredictable breaking or malfunctioning of material. These circumstances call upon the researchers’ capacity to think fast and improvise to get things up and running again.

04 March 2008
The Ubyssey - March 4, 2008 – A speech delivered by Sheila-Watt Cloutier at UBC’s Life Science Centre is commented upon by Michael Byers, ArcticNet Network Investigator. Cloutier speaks of the threats posed by climate change to the Inuit and their way of life.

04 March 2008
Winnipeg Free Press – March 4, 2008 – Several ArcticNet staff and students are featured in this article describing studies on ice and related carbon fluxes conducted onboard the Amundsen. Brent Else, ArcticNet PhD student, is mentioned as well as Frederic Brabant, who works under the aegis of geographer Tim Papakyriakou, ArcticNet Network Investigator. Papakyriakou is overseeing the research concerning greenhouse gas exchanges.

04 March 2008
IlSole24Ore.com; www.guidoromeo.nova100.ilsole24ore.com; www.ipy-cfl.ca – March 4, 2008 – One of the winners of the Amundsen Competition launched by the World Federation of Science Journalists, Guido Romeo, is posting stories in Italy and on the IPY-CFL website detailing his stay onboard the Amundsen. Members of ArcticNet, such as Gary Stern, Network Investigator, and Brent Else, PhD student, are mentioned. Romeo also presents short films of his adventure on his website.

29 February 2008
Winnipeg Free Press – February 29, 2008 – ArcticNet staff and students are featured in this article which relates the research conducted onboard the Amundsen. Louis Letourneau, ArcticNet research technician and Gérald Darnis, ArcticNet PhD student, are mentioned as participating in the collection of zooplankton samples.

28 February 2008
Winnipeg Free Press – February 28, 2008 – Louis Letourneau and Marie-Emmanuelle Rail, ArcticNet research technicians, are mentioned in this article which details the research conducted onboard the Amundsen thanks to the moon pool - the nine-square-metre hole in the hull of the ship used to lower scientific probes, nets and a remotely operated submarine.

27 February 2008
The Canadian Press – February 27, 2008. – ArcticNet Network Investigator, Michael Byers, is quoted in this article relating the $720-million icebreaker announced in Tuesday's budget. The need for such an icebreaker is pressing. It would serve multiple purposes, such as defence, maritime policing and border patrol, scientific research, search and rescue, pollution response, icebreaking and other assistance to commercial traffic.

26 February 2008
Winnipeg Free Press – February 26, 2008. – Research conducted onboard the CCGS Amundsen icebreaker while the ship sits in the Amundsen Gulf, N.W.T. is described. Gary Stern, ArcticNet Network Investigator, is featured describing work done by himself and colleagues at U. of Manitoba. Matthew Asplin, an ArcticNet PhD student, is also mentioned. Ten out of 27 scientists aboard the Amundsen are U. of Manitoba students, staff or allied personnel. The others come from Laval University, the federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Environment Canada and universities in Indiana, Belgium, Germany and Spain.

20 February 2008
Embassy, The Hill Times – February 20, 2008 – Dr. Michael Byers, ArcticNet Network Investigator, is interviewed in this article which discusses his popularity in the media. Byers is a reference for all reporters when it comes to issues on sovereignty in the Arctic North. Byers argues that academics do not share their views and knowledge enough with the public. In his opinion, they should participate more actively in informing society.

20 February 2008
FrancVert, le webzine environnemental – February 20, 2008 – Several ArcticNet members are mentioned in this issue of FrancVert. PhD student, Julie Veillette, wrote an article on polar lakes and their sensitivity to change and their role as sentinels. Christiane Dupont, MSc student, and Isabelle Laurion, ArcticNet Network Investigator, wrote an article on thermokarst ponds and their role in carbon fluxes. Dominique Berteaux, ArcticNet Network Investigator, described the research he and his students conduct on the Arctic fox on Bylot Island.

19 February 2008
National Post, Canwest News Service; canada.com - February 19 and 20, 2008 – A mock summit organized by ArcticNet Network Investigator, Dr. Michael Byers, provided exemplary results and may offer insight and stimulate negotiation efforts between Canada and the US over the future of the Arctic Ocean. This article features the exercise on simulated diplomacy which proved to be efficient.

18 February 2008
BarentsObserver.com – February 18, 2008 – Churchill may become a world hub of trade if climate change continues to enhance navigable trajectories. Dr. Michael Byers, ArcticNet Investigator, is quoted in this article relating the potential changes that climate change could induce on Churchill business.

17 February 2008
RedOrbit NEWS, www.redorbit.com - February 17, 2008 – Dr. Michael Byers, ArcticNet Network Investigator, and Duane Smith, member of the ArcticNet Board of Directors, are cited in this article which discusses Canadian sovereignty. Byers shares his views on ownership disputes between the countries involved, while Smith expresses concern over the government’s failure to consult the Inuit on issues of Arctic sovereignty.

17 February 2008
Times Online, The Sunday Times - February 17, 2008 – The town of Churchill, Manitoba, may become a world hub if climate change redirects the transport game. Dr. Michael Byers, ArcticNet Network Investigator, is quoted in this article which features the changes occurring in Churchill due to warmer climatic conditions.

13 February 2008
CanWest News, canada.com – February 13, 2008 – Dr. Gordon McBean, ArcticNet Network Investigator, is featured in this article covering the special ceremony held on Parliament Hill to honour Canadian scientists who contributed to the international climate change report that won a share of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. According to McBean, hundreds of Canadian researchers have contributed to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) process over the years and this report allows decision-makers to set policy that is based on the best science available.

04 February 2008
The Gazette (Montreal); Vancouver Sun - February 04, 2008 – Louis Fortier, ArcticNet Scientific Director, is quoted in this article relating the financial difficulties faced by major research infrastructure in Canada. Multi-million-dollar research projects are numerous in Canada, but scientists say they are constantly scrambling for funds and need the federal government to provide stable long-term funding.

04 February 2008
Winnipeg Free Press – February 4, 2008. – ArcticNet is mentioned in this article which features the research of an ArcticNet Master’s student, Justin Gilligan. Gilligan examined extreme weather in Nunavut with the University of Manitoba and spent 67 days working alongside residents, joining them on hunting and fishing expeditions on the Churchill River and Hudson Bay.

25 January 2008
Radio-Canada - January 25, 2008 – Reinhard Pienitz, ArcticNet Network Investigator, was interviewed on his paleo-limnological work in the Québec City area. He hopes his findings will influence the city’s water quality management strategies. These findings were discussed at a conference on cyanobacteria held at Université Laval on January 24, 2008.

24 January 2008
Radio-canada.ca Nouvelles – January 24, 2008 – Warwick Vincent, ArcticNet Network Investigator and Theme Leader, is quoted in this news clip announcing the first important workshop on cyanobacteria that was held today at Laval University. Dr. Vincent notes that it is high time to carefully evaluate the health of the province’s watersheds and to begin taking actions towards healthier aquatic ecosystems.

23 January 2008
The Canadian Press; ShortNews.com, Germany; Reuters Canada - January 23, 2008; Shortnews.com – January 24, 2008 – Co-Chair on ArcticNet’s Board of Directors, Mary Simon is quoted in this article which features disturbing statistics on Inuit health. Apparently, the Inuit life expectancy is much shorter than other Canadians and is approximately the same level as the average person in a developing nation such as the Dominican Republic or Egypt.

17 January 2008
Nunatsiaq News – January 17 2008 – Co-Chair on ArcticNet’s Board of Directors, Mary Simon expresses her concern over the fact that more and more Inuit are leaving their communities to live in the South, for a variety of reasons, including work, education and family. However, the high increase in exodus may also be related to poor housing, poor government services, and unemployment.

16 January 2008
CBC News - January 16, 2008 – Mary Simon, president of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami and co-Chair on ArcticNet’s Board of Directors, shares her views on the statistics released concerning the Inuit population and their living conditions and the declining use of the Inuit language, Inuktitut.

16 January 2008
Market Wire (press release) - Jan 16, 2008; Brandonsun.com – January 17, 2008; 680 News, Canada - Jan 17, 2008 – Co-Chair on ArcticNet’s Board of Directors, Mary Simon, is quoted in this article relating the recent meeting held in Kuujjuaq, QC to address the dire health situation of Canadian Inuit. The government announced funding increases for Inuit-specific health services and for the creation of an office on Inuit health.

15 January 2008
Energy Current, filed from Houston, USA - January 15, 2008 – An article featuring Canadian sovereignty and Arctic natural resources quotes Michael Byers, ArcticNet Network Investigator. Debates over land claims, resources and access to the Northwest Passage are heating up.

15 January 2008
CBC News – January 15, 2008 – David Barber, ArcticNet Network Investigator, is quoted in this report of a massive ice fracture discovered off Banks Island in the Beaufort Sea. Barber states that phenomena such as these may increase in frequency with ongoing climate change.

14 January 2008
Reuters – January 14, 2008 – Mary Simon, co-Chair on ArcticNet’s Board of Directors, and Duane Smith, also member of the Board of Directors, denounce environmentalists for insisting the U.S. declare the polar bear a threatened species. They are concerned such a move would hurt the local economy and impede on Inuit culture and their use of resources.

14 January 2008
Reuters - Jan 14, 2008; New York Times, United States - Jan 14, 2008; AFP - Jan 15, 2008; Nunatsiaq News – January 18, 2008 – Mary Simon, co-Chair on ArcticNet’s Board of Directors, and for the last article also Duane Smith, member of ArcticNet’s Board of Directors, are denouncing environmentalists for insisting the USA declare the polar bear a threatened species. They are concerned such a move would hurt the local economy and impede on Inuit culture and their use of resources.

12 January 2008
Toronto Star, TheStar.com – January 12, 2008. – Michael Byers, ArcticNet Network Investigator, is mentioned in this article which features the program of Canada Research Chairs. Byers is listed as Five of Canada's Best in Research. This federal funding has aided in retaining successful researchers within Canada.

12 January 2008
Newsbusters.org – January 12, 2008 – Gordon McBean, a professor at the University of Western Ontario and ArcticNet Network Investigator, is quoted in this article relating weather forecasting and the media’s recent tendency of exaggerating facts.

10 January 2008
The Bulletin, University of Manitoba – January 10, 2008. – The 2007-2008 research expedition organized in part by ArcticNet onboard the CCGS Amundsen is documented in this edition of the Bulletin. ArcticNet Network Investigators Drs. David Barber and Gary Stern are quoted describing the research activities in which they take part. Barber unravels how and where the idea of ArcticNet stemmed. ArcticNet PhD student, Dustin Isleifson, tells of his experience working in the Arctic and describes his research.

09 January 2008
CanWest News Service, canada.com – January 09, 2008 – Martin Sharp, ArcticNet Network Investigator, is quoted in an article featuring the melting of the Barnes Ice Cap on Baffin Island. It is the oldest ice in Canada, some 20,000 years old, and the last remnant of the kilometers-thick Laurentide ice sheet that covered Canada during the last ice age.

08 January 2008
The McGill Tribune – January 8, 2008 – The work of James Ford, ArcticNet Postdoctoral Fellow, on climate change and Inuit adaptation is underscored in this article. For his research, he received one of three 2007 Young Innovator Awards from the Network of Centres for Excellence.

07 January 2008
CNW Group – January 7, 2008 – The Reader's Digest Canada announced their Canadian Heroes of 2007. For the Public Life Award, the recipient is Pita Aatami, Makivik Corporation President and ArcticNet Board Member.

05 January 2008
LeSoleil, cyperpresse.ca - January, 5, 2008 – Pita Aatami, Makivik Corporation President and ArcticNet Board Member, is quoted defending Inuit views that the quota for beluga hunting should be augmented. Aatami is an ardent defender of Inuit rights and their way of life. He suggests that the Department of Fisheries and Oceans review their findings of decreases in beluga populations.